Phrases You Need to Know from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank

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Mastering Academic Writing: Phrases from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank You Need to Know

Are you working on your academic writing and looking for some helpful resources? If so, you’ll want to check out The Manchester Academic Phrasebank. This phrase bank is full of useful phrases that can help you improve your writing. In this blog, we’ll go over some of the most important phrases from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank that you need to know.

One important phrase from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is “to sum up.” This phrase can be used to conclude your paper or essay. For example, you might say “In conclusion, this paper has shown that…” or “To sum up, the evidence suggests that…” This phrase is a great way to wrap up your argument and leave your reader with a clear understanding of your main points.

Another useful phrase from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is “on the one hand…on the other hand.” This phrase can be used to introduce two contrasting viewpoints. For example, you might say “On the one hand, some people argue that… On the other hand, others argue that…” This phrase is a great way to show that you are aware of different arguments on a topic and can help you create a more balanced view.

If you’re looking for a way to introduce new evidence or an example, you can use the phrase “more specifically.” For example, you might say “More specifically, the data shows that…” or “In this case, the patient showed symptoms of…” This phrase is a great way to add clarity to your writing and help your reader follow your argument.

If you want to emphasize a point

If you want to emphasize a point, you can use the phrase “what is more.” For example, you might say “What is more, this evidence suggests that…” or “Furthermore, the data shows that…” This phrase is a great way to add emphasis to a point and make sure your reader understands its importance.

Finally, if you want to introduce a counterargument, you can use the phrase “Nonetheless, it could be argued that…” For example, you might say “Nonetheless, it could be argued that the data does not support this conclusion…” or “Nonetheless, it could be argued that this evidence is not reliable…” This phrase is a great way to introduce a counterargument and make sure your reader is considering all sides of the issue.

These are just a few of the useful phrases from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank that you need to know. By using these phrases in your writing, you can improve the clarity, organization, and balance of your papers and essays.

The Ultimate Guide to Crafting a Literature Review

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The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is a resource for academics who are writing papers, theses, or dissertations. The Phrasebank provides a list of useful phrases that can be used to make your writing sound more scholarly.

In this blog post, we will be discussing how to craft a literature review. A literature review is a summary of research that has been published on a topic. A literature review can be a stand-alone document or it can be part of a larger research paper.

There are several steps that you need to take to craft a literature review. The first step is to choose a topic. Once you have chosen a topic, you need to find sources that are relevant to your topic. Once you have found relevant sources, you need to read and take notes on those sources. After you have read and taken notes on your sources, you need to write a draft of your literature review. Finally, you need to revise and edit your literature review.

Literature review

The phrase ” literature review” can be used to refer to the process of writing a literature review, or it can be used to refer to the finished product. A literature review can be either quantitative or qualitative. A quantitative literature review will summarize and analyze the data that has been published on a topic. A qualitative literature review will synthesize the data that has been published on a topic.

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There are a few things that you need to keep in mind when you are writing a literature review. First, you need to make sure that your literature review is well-organized. You also need to make sure that you are using scholarly language. Finally, you need to make sure that you are citing your sources correctly.

The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is a great resource for finding the right phrases to use in your literature review. The Phrasebank can help you sound more scholarly and can help you to organize your thoughts.

Unraveling the Mystery of Research Methodology

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Are you interested in pursuing a research career? Or perhaps you’re already working in the field and are looking to improve your skills. In either case, understanding research methodology is essential.

The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is a great resource for learning the language of research. Here are some of the most important phrases you need to know:

“To investigate (a phenomenon/problem)”

When you’re conducting research, you’re trying to learn more about a particular topic. This could be a specific phenomenon or problem that you’re trying to understand.

“To address (a question/issue)”

Your research should be focused on answering specific questions or addressing particular issues. This will help to ensure that your work is relevant and useful.

“To adopt/employ (a methodology)”

There are many different research methodologies that you can choose from. It’s important to select the one that is best suited to your particular project.

“To collect data”

Data is the information that you collect during your research. This could come from interviews, surveys, observations, or other sources.

“To analyze data”

Once you have collected data, it’s time to start analyzing it. This involves looking for patterns and connections that can help you to understand the phenomenon or problem you’re studying.

“To conclude”

After you have analyzed your data, you need to conclude it. This means interpreting your findings and explaining what they mean.

“To make recommendations”

based on your research, you may make recommendations for further action or future research. These recommendations should be supported by your data and conclusions.

The Art of Paraphrasing

When it comes to writing academic papers, paraphrasing is an essential skill to have. Paraphrasing allows you to take complex information and turn it into your own words, making it easier for your readers to understand.

There are a few things to keep in mind when paraphrasing:

1. Make sure you understand the original text before you start paraphrasing.

This seems like a no-brainer, but it’s easy to get caught up in the process of rewording and lose sight of what the original author was trying to say. So take a few minutes to read and reread the text, and make sure you have a firm grasp on the main idea before you start writing.

2. Use your own words.

This is probably the most important rule of paraphrasing. It’s tempting to just swap out a few words here and there and call it a day, but that’s not paraphrasing. To do it effectively, you need to use your own words and sentence structure to say the same thing as the original text.

3. Don’t copy the author’s style.

Again, it’s tempting to just mimic the author’s writing style when you’re paraphrasing, but resist the urge. Your paper should have its voice, so make sure your paraphrases reflect that.

4. Keep it brief.

A paraphrase should be shorter than the original text, so resist the temptation to include extra information or digressions. Just focus on getting the main idea across in your own words.

5. Cite your sources.

Whenever you paraphrase, make sure to give credit to the original author by including a citation. This shows that you’re using someone else’s ideas and also helps your readers find the source if they want to read more about it.

The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is a great resource for finding just the right words to use when paraphrasing. It includes a list of over 1,000 useful phrases organized by topic, so you can quickly find just what you need.

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Here are a few examples:

To introduce a topic:

– “This paper will explore the phenomenon of…”

– “In this essay, I will examine… “

– “This paper will discuss… “

To state an opinion:

– “I believe that… “

– “It seems to me that… “

– “In my opinion… “

To introduce evidence:

– “According to X… “

– “As X points out… “

– “X’s research shows that… “

To conclude:

– “In conclusion… “

– “To sum up… “

– “All things considered… “

With practice, paraphrasing will become second nature and your papers will flow more smoothly as a result. So don’t be afraid to get started today!

Signposting Your Way to Clarity

If you’re anything like me, you’re always looking for ways to improve your writing. One way to do that is to use signposts to guide your readers through your work. The Manchester Academic Phrasebank is a great resource for finding the right phrases to use as signposts in your writing. Here are some of the phrases you’ll need to know:

“To understand X, it is first necessary to consider Y”: This phrase is a great way to introduce a topic that you’ll be discussing in more detail later on.

“This begs the question”: This phrase is often used when introducing a controversial topic. It signals to the reader that you are about to address an issue that is not yet fully resolved.

“It is important to note that”: This phrase is a great way to introduce a point that you feel is important for your reader to know.

“This is not to say that”: This phrase is often used to introduce a point that contradicts something you’ve said earlier. It’s a way of saying “I’m not saying that X is true, but I do want you to consider Y.”

“It is worth noting that”: This phrase is similar to “It is important to note that,” but it is often used to introduce a point that is not as crucial to the argument.

X is an important factor to consider when discussing Y

“X is a controversial topic, and there are many different opinions on the matter”: This phrase is a great way to introduce a controversial topic. It signals to the reader that you are about to address an issue that is not yet fully resolved.

“There are many different interpretations of X”: This phrase is often used when discussing a text or event that can be interpreted in multiple ways. It’s a way of saying “There is no one correct interpretation of X, but I want you to consider Y.”

“This suggests that”: This phrase is often used to introduce a point that supports your argument.

“This raises the question of”: This phrase is often used to introduce a question that you will be addressing later on.

“The implications of this are”: This phrase is often used to introduce a point that has far-reaching implications.

Critical Writing

One of the most important skills that you need to learn to be successful in academia is critical writing. This involves being able to identify the key points in an argument and then evaluate them to form your own opinion. To do this, you need to be familiar with some of the key phrases from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank.

The first phrase is “to critically evaluate”. This means looking at the evidence and arguments for and against something to form your own opinion. For example, if you are asked to critically evaluate a paper, you would need to consider the arguments that the author makes, as well as any counterarguments.

The next phrase is “to assess the merits of”. This means to judge the value of something. For example, you may be asked to assess the merits of a particular theory. To do this, you would need to consider the evidence that supports the theory, as well as any criticisms of it.

The final phrase is “to conclude that”. This means reaching a decision or judgment based on the evidence that you have considered. For example, you may conclude that a particular theory is correct, or that a piece of research is flawed.

If you can master these three phrases, then you will be well on your way to being able to write critically.

Hedging in Academic Writing

Hedging in academic writing is when you choose your words carefully to make sure that you don’t make any claims that are too absolute. It’s important to do this because otherwise, your argument might not be as convincing.

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There are a few different ways that you can hedge in academic writing. One way is to use phrases like “this suggests that” or “it is possible that.” For example, if you want to say that something is true but you’re not sure if it’s 100% true, you might say “This suggests that the theory is correct.”

Another way to hedge is to use words like “may,” “might,” or “could.” For example, you might say “The data could be interpreted in different ways.”

You can also use hedging to make your argument sound more tentative. For example, if you’re not sure about something, you might say “I’m not sure if this is true, but it might be worth considering.”

Phrases You Need to Know from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank:

– to suggest (that):

This suggests that the theory is correct.

– it is possible (that):

The data may have been misinterpreted.

– may, might, could:

The data could be interpreted in different ways.

– I’m not sure (if):

I’m not sure if this is true, but it might be worth considering.

Comparing and Contrasting Made Easy

If you’re a student, chances are you’ll be asked to write a compare-and-contrast essay at some point. A compare and contrast essay is exactly what it sounds like—an essay in which you compare two things and contrast two things.

There are a few different ways you could approach writing a compare-and-contrast essay. You could compare and contrast two things that you know well, like your two favorite sports teams. Or you could compare and contrast two things that you’re interested in but don’t know much about, like two politicians from different countries.

No matter what you choose to compare and contrast, you’ll need to use some basic Compare and Contrast phrases to structure your essay. Here are some Phrases You Need to Know from The Manchester Academic Phrasebank:

Introducing the topic:

-This essay will compare and contrast…

-The purpose of this essay is to compare and contrast…

-In this essay, I will be comparing and contrasting…

Stating your point of view:

-As far as I am concerned,…

-From my point of view,…

-In my opinion,…

Listing points:

-Firstly,…

-Secondly,…

-Thirdly,…

-Finally,…

Comparing:

-Similarly,…

-In the same way,…

-Likewise,…

– Likewise, … can be seen in both … and …

– In addition, … is also true of …

– Just as … so too …

Contrasting:

-However,…

-On the other hand,…

-On the contrary,…

-Despite this,…

-Yet, … whereas …

– In contrast to …, … is more …

Now that you know some basic Compare and Contrast phrases, let’s look at a few examples of how to use them in a compare-and-contrast essay.

Example 1: Compare and Contrast Two Sports Teams

If you’re a sports fan, you might want to compare and contrast two of your favorite sports teams. Here’s an example of how you could do that:

The New York Yankees and the Boston Red Sox are two of the most popular baseball teams in the United States. They both have a long history, dating back to the early 1900s. And they both have a large following of fans who are die-hard supporters of their team.

As far as I am concerned, there are a few key differences between the two teams. Firstly, the Yankees have won more World Series titles than the Red Sox. Secondly, the Yankees play in a larger stadium than the Red Sox. And finally, the Yankees have more money to spend on players than the Red Sox.

From my point of view, these differences make the Yankees a better baseball team than the Red Sox. But I know that many people feel just as passionately about the Red Sox as I do about the Yankees. So I can understand why some people would disagree with me.

Example 2: Compare and Contrast Two Politicians

If you’re interested in politics, you might want to compare and contrast two politicians from different countries. Here’s an example of how you could do that:

Nelson Mandela was a political leader in South Africa who fought against apartheid. He was jailed for his beliefs but later released and went on to become the President of South Africa. Aung San Suu Kyi is a political leader in Myanmar who is fighting for democracy in her country. She has been placed under house arrest several times but continues to fight for her beliefs.

Both Nelson Mandela and Aung San Suu Kyi have dedicated their lives to fighting for what they believe in. They both have faced imprisonment for their beliefs. And they both continue to fight for their causes even when it’s not easy.

From my point of view, Nelson Mandela and Aung San Suu Kyi are both inspiring political leaders. They both show that it’s possible to fight for what you believe in even when the odds are against you.

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